A word about transparency

There’s a reason why respectable media outlets – from the New York Times and Wall Street Journal, to The Economist and The Miami Herald – are credible sources of news and information.

It’s not because they have the biggest staffs or the most readers and it has nothing to do with their editorial budgets or the number of Pulitzers they’ve won.

It’s because they prioritize transparency. You may not always agree with the content they publish, but they take a clear stand, they are unabashedly in the business of reporting the news, and they have worked for years – even centuries – to earn our trust.

But there’s a big difference between the work of respectable media outlets (many blogs, such as Curbed Miami, included) and that of so-called ‘activists’ and ‘citizen journalists’ who publish false and defamatory information and resort to stirring the pot via social media with the goal of advancing their hidden agendas, fueling unfounded speculation, and discrediting those who oppose their own opinions.

We prefer to associate with the former. Our view is that information should be reported fairly and accurately, based on fact rather than suspicion or belief.

So to put the rumors to rest, our firm is in no way connected with exMiami. Though we find it telling – even comical – that a small group of people with ulterior motives of their own have gone to great lengths to link our company with the site, absent a single shred of proof other than the fact that some of our clients have been the subject of accurately-reported coverage in the past.

Sure, we are engaged in all aspects of real estate (and plenty of other sectors, for that matter); we employ people who are smart and talented and hungry for consuming and communicating news; and we have indeed developed strong relationships in the community (as the CrespoGram Report is quick to point out), but the mystery that surrounds exMiami contradicts just about everything our company stands for.

Our firm’s motives are crystal clear and our work speaks for itself. We represent businesses and organizations who see value in communicating with the public in a transparent and factual manner. We like to think that being up-front about who we are and what we do has helped us earn credibility in the eyes of our clients, the community, and local, national and international media.

That’s the standard that guides credible sources of information, and it’s the same standard we apply to ourselves when advocating on behalf of our clients.

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Comments

  • Grant Stern

    The Exmiami blog publishes factually incorrect information, and refuses to retract or refute my specific and fully verified to be factually correct claims of one well known instance. Furthermore, this ExMiami blog claims to be independent journalists, but is actually a completely anonymous organization who doesn’t even pretend to value transparency. There is no dispute that their blog may write anything it wishes about within the boundaries of the law, reason and their own discretion.

    It is also at my discretion that a complaint with the FTC is being formulated with counsel, to pursue a reasonable public action claim that ExMiami is writing advertorial content (that is paid content, meant to look like factual reporting) without disclosing who is sponsoring or paying for such content. I invite Schwartz Media to be party to the FTC complaint we are mulling, once drafted and finalized with our counsel.